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"Der Mensch vor der Frage nach dem Sinn"
Vortrag vom Psychiater und Neurologen Viktor Frankl
Universität Wien, 9. Oktober 1979
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wie kuhl ist das bitte!? wieso lernen wir sowas nicht?
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gender stereotypes How harmful gender stereotype body posture in the media and portrayals of bad body postures and the body in the media create gender stereotypes and are harming us - warping our bodies and minds, making us aggressive or submissive. You'll never look at a magazine in the same way again after watching this rant. I'll probably be sued for this video but what the hell, it needs saying. Much of my thinking around this topic comes from Paul Linden Sensei so a word of thanks to him too.
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I hope that in this year to come, you make mistakes.

Because if you are making mistakes, then you are making new things, trying new things, learning, living, pushing yourself, changing yourself, changing your world. You're doing things you've never done before, and more importantly, you're Doing Something.

So that's my wish for you, and all of us, and my wish for myself. Make New Mistakes. Make glorious, amazing mistakes. Make mistakes nobody's ever made before. Don't freeze, don't stop, don't worry that it isn't good enough, or it isn't perfect, whatever it is: art, or love, or work or family or life.

Whatever it is you're scared of doing, Do it.

Make your mistakes, next year and forever.
Neil Gaiman's Journal: My New Year Wish
Reposted bymitzumikaremajeranek
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SAIL by AWOLNATION
video by nanalew and meekakitty

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i had this song in my head for some time but couldn't remember neither the band's name, nor the song's title, nor any of the lyrics. by applying advanced internet searching skills and a considerable amount of time i was finally able to excavate it from youtube. then i realized that this wasn't actually the official music video of the song, but the sole work of the two women in the video, who are by the way formidable vloggers. and there goes another night in front of youtube...
Reposted byowoclasumeganne22
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Dealing with Panic Attacks & Anxiety RE: Zoella - YouTube
Reposted bymihi mihi
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Kiss by PRINCE played by David Helbock on prepared piano
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In the schools I went to, being smart just didn't matter much. Kids didn't admire it or despise it. All other things being equal, they would have preferred to be on the smart side of average rather than the dumb side, but intelligence counted far less than, say, physical appearance, charisma, or athletic ability.

So if intelligence in itself is not a factor in popularity, why are smart kids so consistently unpopular? The answer, I think, is that they don't really want to be popular.

If someone had told me that at the time, I would have laughed at him. Being unpopular in school makes kids miserable, some of them so miserable that they commit suicide. Telling me that I didn't want to be popular would have seemed like telling someone dying of thirst in a desert that he didn't want a glass of water. Of course I wanted to be popular.

But in fact I didn't, not enough. There was something else I wanted more: to be smart. Not simply to do well in school, though that counted for something, but to design beautiful rockets, or to write well, or to understand how to program computers. In general, to make great things.

At the time I never tried to separate my wants and weigh them against one another. If I had, I would have seen that being smart was more important. If someone had offered me the chance to be the most popular kid in school, but only at the price of being of average intelligence (humor me here), I wouldn't have taken it.

Much as they suffer from their unpopularity, I don't think many nerds would. To them the thought of average intelligence is unbearable. But most kids would take that deal. For half of them, it would be a step up. Even for someone in the eightieth percentile (assuming, as everyone seemed to then, that intelligence is a scalar), who wouldn't drop thirty points in exchange for being loved and admired by everyone?

And that, I think, is the root of the problem. Nerds serve two masters. They want to be popular, certainly, but they want even more to be smart. And popularity is not something you can do in your spare time, not in the fiercely competitive environment of an American secondary school.
– Paul Graham | Why Nerds are Unpopular
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The Basic Elements of Creativity

Reposted fromsawb sawb
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If you’ve never had the feeling that part of your identity isn’t represented in popular culture, if you have an easy time of finding stories that include people who look and act like you, it can be really difficult to understand why this is so important to some of us. I get that. This is a tricky thing to relate to if you’ve never encountered it yourself. As someone who has experienced that feeling her entire life, believe me when I say that it leaves a void in you. If you often feel like the odd one out in reality, a lack of visibility in the stories that you love insidiously re-enforces the belief that that’s exactly how it’s meant to be — that you’re weird, or lesser, or unwanted. If you carry that feeling around with you, finding a story that does include you, that tells you that you’re both welcome and awesome, is a transformative experience. My favorite example of this is Mae Jemison, the first African-American woman to become an astronaut, who was inspired to join the space program after seeing Lieutenant Uhura on the original Star Trek. Fictional characters make a real difference. And even if we don’t become astronauts or people of note, the feeling of acceptance that comes with seeing a hero like ourselves is still profound, especially when it’s within a medium or a setting that we already care about. When I first played Mass Effect and saw that the savior of the galaxy could not only be a courageous, persevering woman, but that she could also get the girl, I felt like I had come home. As the crew of the Normandy fought Sovereign, and later Harbinger, I battled my personal demons — my discomfort with my sexuality, my lack of confidence, my low self-esteem. Those games walked alongside me as I learned to open up to others and love myself a little more. Commander Shepard gave me armor, and I wear it still. I’m not sure that would’ve happened if she hadn’t been, categorically speaking, someone like me.
Why Talking About Character Gender Still Matters (Even Though It Shouldn’t) | The Mary Sue
Reposted fromNorkNork NorkNork
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The trick to being truly creative, I’ve always maintained, is to be completely unselfconscious. To resist the urge to self-censor. To not-give-a-shit what anybody thinks. That’s why children are so good at it.
Linds Redding | A Short Lesson in Perspective
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The 365 Knitting Clock by Siren Elise Wilhelmsen is quite a poetic way of showing the passing of time.

Reposted fromsawb sawb viaalphabet alphabet
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Reposted frommajkey majkey viaclifford clifford
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just wow.
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Stop motion form and colour, using light painting techniques | by Kim Pimmel
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